INDEX

"School of Athens" Fresco in Apostol...

School of Athens” Fresco in Apostolic Palace, Rome, Vatican City, by Raphael 1509 – 1510 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

TIMELINE

  • THE FIRST MILLENIUM

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  • ARCHIMEDES (c.287 – c.212 BC)

    Third Century BCE – Syracuse (a Greek city in Sicily)

    ‘Archimedes’ Screw – a device used to pump water out of ships and to irrigate fields’

    Archimedes investigated the principles of static mechanics and pycnometry (the measurement of the volume or density of an object). He was responsible for the science of hydrostatics, the study of the displacement of bodies in water.

    Archimedes’ Principle

    Buoyancy – ‘A body fully or partially immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body’
    The upthrust (upward force) on a floating object such as a ship is the same as the weight of water it displaces. The volume of the displaced liquid is the same as the volume of the immersed object. This is why an object will float. When an object is immersed in water, its weight pulls it down, but the water, as Archimedes realised, pushes back up with a force that is equal to the weight of water the object pushes out-of-the-way. The object sinks until its weight is equal to the upthrust of the water, at which point it floats.
    Objects that weigh less than the water displaced will float and objects that weigh more will sink. Archimedes showed this to be a precise and easily calculated mathematical principle.

    Syracuse’s King Hiero, suspecting that the goldsmith had not made his crown of pure gold as instructed, asked Archimedes to find out the truth without damaging the crown.

    Archimedes first immersed in water a piece of gold that weighed the same as the crown and pointed out the subsequent rise in water level. He then immersed the crown and showed that the water level was higher than before. This meant that the crown must have a greater volume than the gold, even though it was the same weight. Therefore it could not be pure gold and Archimedes thus concluded that the goldsmith had substituted some gold with a metal of lesser density such as silver. The fraudulent goldsmith was executed.

    Archimedes came to understand and explain the principles behind the compound pulley, windlass, wedge and screw, as well as finding ways to determine the centre of gravity of objects.
    He showed that the ratio of weights to one another on each end of a balance goes down in exact mathematical proportion to the distance from the pivot of the balance.

    Perhaps the most important inventions to his peers were the devices created during the Roman siege of Syracuse in the second Punic war.

    He was killed by a Roman soldier during the sack of the city.

    Π The Greek symbol pi (enclosed in a picture of an apple) - Pi is a name given to the ratio of the circumference of a circle to the diameterPi

    ‘All circles are similar and the ratio of the circumference to the diameter of a circle is always the same number, known as the constant, Pi’

    Pi-unrolled-720.gif    

    The Greek tradition disdained the practical.  Following PLATO the Greeks believed pure mathematics was the key to the perfect truth that lay behind the imperfect real world, so that anything that could not be completely worked out with a ruler and compass and elegant calculations was not true.

    In the eighteenth century AD the Swiss mathematician LEONHARD EULER was the first person to use the letter  Π , the initial letter of the Greek word for perimeter, to represent this ratio.

    The earliest reference to the ratio of the circumference of a circle to the diameter is an Egyptian papyrus written in 1650 BCE, but Archimedes first calculated the most accurate value.

    He calculated Pi to be 22/7, a figure which was widely used for the next 1500 years. His value lies between 3 1/2 and 3 10/71, or between 3.142 and 3.141 accurate to two decimal places.

    ‘The Method of Exhaustion – an integral-like limiting process used to compute the area and volume of two-dimensional lamina and three-dimensional solids’

    Archimedes realised how much could be achieved through practical approximations, or, as the Greeks called them, mechanics. He was able to calculate the approximate area of a circle by first working out the area of the biggest hexagon that would fit inside it and then the area of the smallest that would fit around it, with the idea in mind that the area of the circle must lie approximately halfway between.

    By going from hexagons to polygons with 96 sides, he could narrow the margin for error considerably. In the same way he worked out the approximate area contained by all kinds of different curves from the area of rectangles fitted into the curve. The smaller and more numerous the rectangles, the closer to the right figure the approximation became.

    This is the basis of what thousands of years later came to be called integral calculus.
    Archimedes’ reckonings were later used by Kepler, Fermat, Leibniz and Newton.

    In his treatise ‘On the Sphere and the Cylinder’, Archimedes was the first to deduce that the volume of a sphere is 4/3 Pi r3  where r  is the radius.

    He also deduced that a sphere’s surface area can be worked out by multiplying that of its greatest circle by four; or, similarly, a sphere’s volume is two-thirds that of its circumscribing cylinder.

    Like the square and cube roots of 2, Pi is an irrational number; it takes a never-ending string of digits to express Pi as a number.
    It is impossible to find the exact value of Pi – however, the value can be calculated to any required degree of accuracy.
    In 2002 Yasumasa Kanada (b.1949) of Tokyo University used a supercomputer with a memory of 1024GB to compute the value to 124,100,000,000 decimal places. It took 602 hours to perform the calculation.

    (image source)

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    • Pi (math.com)

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    http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn22545-dna-imaged-with-electron-microscope-for-the-first-time.html.

    New Scientist logo - link to New Scientist magazine

    GEORG SIMON OHM (1789-1854)

    1827 – Germany

    ‘The electric current in a conductor is proportional to the potential difference’

    In equation form, V = IR, where V is the potential difference, I is the current and R is a constant called resistance.

    greek symbol capital ohm (480 x 480)

    Ohm’s law links voltage (potential difference) with current and resistance and the scientists VOLTA, AMPERE and OHM.

    Ohm is now honoured by having the unit of electrical resistance named after him.
    If we use units of VI and R, Ohm’s law can be written in units as:

    volts = ampere × ohm

    photograph of george simon ohm © + diagram of simple electric circuit

    GEORG OHM


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    CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY & WESTERN SCIENCE

    bust said to depict a likeness of Socrates

    The speculative Greek philosophers, considering the great overarching principles that controlled the Cosmos, were handicapped by a reluctance to test their speculations by experimentation.
    At the other end of the spectrum were the craftsmen who fired and glazed pottery, who forged weapons out of bronze and iron. They in turn were hindered by their reluctance to speculate about the principles that governed their craft.

    WESTERN SCIENCE is often credited with discoveries and inventions that have been observed in other cultures in earlier centuries.
    This can be due to a lack of reliable records, difficulty in discerning fact from legend, problems in pinning down a finding to an individual or group or simple ignorance.

    The Romans were technologists and made little contribution to pure science and then from the fall of Rome to the Renaissance science regressed. Through this time, science and technology evolved independently and to a large extent one could have science without technology and technology without science.

    Later, there developed a movement to ‘Christianise Platonism’ (Thierry of Chartres).

    Platonism at its simplest is the study and debate of the various arguments put forward by the Greek philosopher PLATO (428/7-348/7 BCE).
    The philosopher Plotinus is attributed with having founded neo-Platonism, linking Christian and Gnostic beliefs to debate various arguments within their doctrines. One strand of thought linked together three intellectual states of being: the Good (or the One), the Intelligence and the Soul. The neo-Platonic Academy in Greece was closed by the Emperor Justinian in CE 529.
    During the early years of the Renaissance, texts on neo-platonism began to be reconsidered, translated and discoursed.

    Aristotle’s four causes, from the ‘Timaeus’, were attributed to the Christian God, who works through secondary causes (such as angels).

    Efficient Cause – Creator – God the Father

    Formal Cause – Secondary agent – God the Son

    Material Cause – The four elements: earth, air, fire & water.
    Because these four are only fundamental forms of the single type of matter, they cannot be related to any idea of ‘elements’ as understood by modern science – they could be transmuted into each other. Different substances, although composed of matter would have different properties due to the differing amounts of the qualities of form and spirit. Thus a lump of lead is made of the same type of matter (fundamental form) as a lump of gold, but has a different aggregation of constituents. Neither lead nor gold would contain much spirit – not as much as air, say, and certainly not as much as God, who is purely spiritual. ( ALCHEMY )

    Final Cause – Holy Spirit

    All other is ‘natural’ – underwritten by God in maintaining the laws of nature without recourse to the supernatural.
    Science was the method for investigating the world. It involved carrying out careful experiments, with nature as the ultimate arbiter of which theories were right and which were wrong.

    Robert Grosseteste (1168-1253) Bishop of Lincoln (Robert ‘Bighead’) – neo-Platonic reading of Genesis – emanation of God’s goodness, like light, begins creation. Light is thus a vehicle of creation and likewise knowledge (hence ‘illumination’), a dimensionless point of matter with a dimensionless point of light superimposed upon it (dimensions are created by God). Spherical radiation of light carries matter with it until it is dissipated. Led to studies of optical phenomena (rainbow, refraction, reflection).

    Picture of stained glass window said to portray ROBERT GROSSETESTE ©

    ROBERT GROSSETESTE

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    Mathematicians

    picture of mathematician Pythagoras

    picture of mathematician Euclid

    picture of mathematician Archimedes

    picture of mathematician Hipparchus

    picture of mathematician Al Khwarizmi

    Image of the head of statue of Fibonacci


    picture of mathematician Descartes

    image depicting Pierre de Fermat ©

    picture of mathematician Pascal

    picture of mathematician Carl Gauss

    picture of mathematician Gottfried Liebniz

    image of David Hilbert made from the Hilbert curve

    portrait of Paul Dirac © neon designs 2012

    picture of mathematician Isaac Newton

    picture of mathematician Alan Turing

    Statue of Janus Bolyai©

    picture of mathematician Daniel Bernoulli

    picture of mathematician George Boole

    picture of mathematician Ludwig Boltzman

    Bust depicting Evariste Galois©

    Picture of Osborne Reynolds&copy

    Portrait of Leonhard Euler (1707-83)©

    picture of mathematician Kurt Godel

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    ALBERT EINSTEIN (1879-1955)

    1905 – Switzerland

    1. ‘the relativity principle: All laws of science are the same in all frames of reference.
    2. constancy of the speed of light: The speed of light in a vacuüm is constant and is independent of the speed of the observer’
    photo portrait of Albert Einstein &copy:

    EINSTEIN

    The laws of physics are identical to different spectators, regardless of their position, as long as they are moving at a constant speed in relation to each other. Above all the speed of light is constant. Classical laws of mechanics seem to be obeyed in our normal lives because the speeds involved are insignificant.

    Newton’s recipe for measuring the speed of a body moving through space involved simply timing it as it passed between two fixed points. This is based on the assumptions that time is flowing at the same rate for everyone – that there is such a thing as ‘absolute’ time, and that two observers would always agree on the distance between any two points in space.
    The implications of this principle if the observers are moving at different speeds are bizarre and normal indicators of velocity such as distance and time become warped. Absolute space and time do not exist. The faster an object is moving the slower time moves. Objects appear to become shorter in the direction of travel. Mass increases as the speed of an object increases. Ultimately nothing may move faster than or equal to the speed of light because at that point it would have infinite mass, no length and time would stand still.

    ‘The energy (E) of a body equals its mass (m) times the speed of light (c) squared’

    This equation shows that mass and energy are mutually convertible under certain conditions.

    The mass-energy equation is a consequence of Einstein’s theory of special relativity and declares that only a small amount of atomic mass could unleash huge amounts of energy.

    Two of his early papers described Brownian motion and the ‘photoelectric’ effect (employing PLANCK’s quantum theory and helping to confirm Planck’s ideas in the process).

    1915 – Germany

    ‘Objects do not attract each other by exerting pull, but the presence of matter in space causes space to curve in such a manner that a gravitational field is set up. Gravity is the property of space itself’

    From 1907 to 1915 Einstein developed his special theory into a general theory that included equating accelerating forces and gravitational forces. This implies light rays would be bent by gravitational attraction and electromagnetic radiation wavelengths would be increased under gravity. Moreover, mass and the resultant gravity, warps space and time, which would otherwise be ‘flat’, into curved paths that other masses (e.g. the moons of planets) caught within the field of the distortion follow. The predictions from special and general relativity were gradually proven by experimental evidence.

    Einstein spent much of the rest of his life trying to devise a unified theory of electromagnetic, gravitational and nuclear fields.

    picture of the Nobel medal - link to nobelprize.org

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