ROBERT HOOKE (1635-1703)

1670 – England

‘Within the limits of elasticity, the extension ( Strain ) of an elastic material is proportional to the applied stretching force ( Stress )’

Hooke’s law applies to all kinds of materials, from rubber balls to steel springs. The law helps define the limits of elasticity of a material.

In equation form; the law is expressed as F = kx, where F is force, x change in length and k is a constant. The constant is known as Young’s Modulus, after THOMAS YOUNG who in 1802 gave physical meaning to k.

Boyle and Hooke formed the nucleus of scientists at Gresham College in Oxford who were to create the Royal Society in 1662 and Hooke served as its secretary until his death. Newton disliked Hooke’s combative style (Hooke accused Newton of plagiarism, sparking a lifelong feud between the two) and refused to attend Royal Society meetings while Hooke was a secretary.

Hooke mistrusted his contemporaries so much that when he discovered his law he published it as a Latin anagram, ceiiinosssttvu, in his book on elasticity.

Two years later, when he was sure that the law could be proved by experiments on springs, he revealed that the anagram meant Ut tensio sic vis. That is, the power of any spring is in the same proportion with the tension thereof.

Robert Hooke's drawing of his microscope.Born in 1635, the multi-talented English physicist Robert Hooke discovered the law of elasticity, which is called Hooke's Law, and performed extensive microscope studies.

Robert Hooke’s drawing of his microscope

At the same time, in 1665 Hooke published his work Micrographia presenting fifty-seven illustrations drawn by him of the wonders seen with the microscope.

Hooke's drawing of a flea from Micrographia. Robert Hooke published 'Micrographia' in 1665. It is his most famous work, and is notable for the stunning illustrations, drawn by Hooke himself.

Hooke’s drawing of a flea from Micrographia

Wikipedia-logo © (link to wikipedia)

NEXT buttonNEXT

Related sites

7 thoughts on “ROBERT HOOKE (1635-1703)

  1. Pingback: ANTON VAN LEEUWENHOEK (1632-1723) | A History of Science

  2. Pingback: ISAAC NEWTON (1642-1727) | A History of Science

  3. Pingback: ROBERT BROWN (1773-1858) | A History of Science

  4. Pingback: ROBERT BROWN (1773-1858) | neilsen

  5. Pingback: ISAAC NEWTON (1642-1727) | neilsen

  6. Pingback: ROBERT BOYLE (1627- 91) | neilsen

  7. Pingback: ANTON VAN LEEUWENHOEK (1632-1723) | neilsen

Leave a comment - especially if you find factual or grammatical errors

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s