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"School of Athens" Fresco in Apostol...

“School of Athens” Fresco in Apostolic Palace, Rome, Vatican City, by Raphael 1509-1510 (Photo credit:Wikipedia)

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Mathematicians

picture of mathematician Pythagoras

picture of mathematician Euclid

picture of mathematician Archimedes

picture of mathematician Hipparchus

picture of mathematician Al Khwarizmi

Image of the head of statue of Fibonacci


picture of mathematician Descartes

image depicting Pierre de Fermat ©

picture of mathematician Pascal

picture of mathematician Carl Gauss

picture of mathematician Gottfried Liebniz

image of David Hilbert made from the Hilbert curve

portrait of Paul Dirac © neon designs 2012

picture of mathematician Isaac Newton

picture of mathematician Alan Turing

Statue of Janus Bolyai©

picture of mathematician Daniel Bernoulli

picture of mathematician George Boole

picture of mathematician Ludwig Boltzman

Bust depicting Evariste Galois©

Picture of Osborne Reynolds&copy

Portrait of Leonhard Euler (1707-83)©

picture of mathematician Kurt Godel

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School of Athens by Raphael

School of Athens by Raphael

School of Athens by Raphael


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THE PLATONIC SOLIDS

The properties of solid figures have kept mathematicians occupied for centuries. Polyhedra are formed from regular polygons such as squares or triangles and mathematicians have failed to find any more than five of them.

Although they were defined by Pythagoras two hundred years before PLATO was born, they are known collectively as the platonic solids, named in honour of Plato by the geometer Euclid.

the five Platonic solids

“THE PLATONIC SOLIDS – The regular polyhedron is defined as a three-dimensional solid comprising regular polygons for its surfaces – and with all its surfaces, edges and vertices identical. The five regular polyhedra are the tetrahedron (four triangular faces), the cube (six square faces), the octahedron (eight triangular faces), the dodecahedron (twelve pentagonal faces) and the icosahedron (twenty triangular faces).”

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