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    JOHN DEE (1527-1608)

    Portrait of JOHN DEE ©

    JOHN DEE

    ‘Mathematician, cartographer & astronomer. Prolific author, natural magician, alchemist.’

    ‘Alternative knowledge and methods of learning. ‘Conversations with Angels’. Human power over the world (neo-Platonism).’

    Dee was a Hermetic philosopher, a major influence on the ROSICRUCIANS, possibly a spy – astrologer and adviser to Queen Elizabeth I; he chose the day of her coronation.

    One of the greatest scholars of his day. His library in his home in Mortlake, London, contained more than 3,000 books.

    Greatly influenced by Edward Kelley (1555- 97), whom he met in 1582; from 1583-1589 Dee and Kelley sought the patronage of assorted mid-European noblemen and kings, eventually finding it from the Bohemian Count Vilem Rosenberg.
    In 1589, Dee left Kelley to his alchemical research and returned to England where Queen Elizabeth I granted him a position as a college warden; however he had lost respect owing to his occult reputation. Dee returned to Mortlake in 1605 in poor health and increasing poverty and ended his days as a common fortune-teller.

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    CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY & WESTERN SCIENCE

    bust said to depict a likeness of Socrates

    The speculative Greek philosophers, considering the great overarching principles that controlled the Cosmos, were handicapped by a reluctance to test their speculations by experimentation.
    At the other end of the spectrum were the craftsmen who fired and glazed pottery, who forged weapons out of bronze and iron. They in turn were hindered by their reluctance to speculate about the principles that governed their craft.

    WESTERN SCIENCE is often credited with discoveries and inventions that have been observed in other cultures in earlier centuries.
    This can be due to a lack of reliable records, difficulty in discerning fact from legend, problems in pinning down a finding to an individual or group or simple ignorance.

    The Romans were technologists and made little contribution to pure science and then from the fall of Rome to the Renaissance science regressed. Through this time, science and technology evolved independently and to a large extent one could have science without technology and technology without science.

    Later, there developed a movement to ‘Christianise Platonism’ (Thierry of Chartres).

    Platonism at its simplest is the study and debate of the various arguments put forward by the Greek philosopher PLATO (428/7-348/7 BCE).
    The philosopher Plotinus is attributed with having founded neo-Platonism, linking Christian and Gnostic beliefs to debate various arguments within their doctrines. One strand of thought linked together three intellectual states of being: the Good (or the One), the Intelligence and the Soul. The neo-Platonic Academy in Greece was closed by the Emperor Justinian in CE 529.
    During the early years of the Renaissance, texts on neo-platonism began to be reconsidered, translated and discoursed.

    Aristotle’s four causes, from the ‘Timaeus’, were attributed to the Christian God, who works through secondary causes (such as angels).

    Efficient Cause – Creator – God the Father

    Formal Cause – Secondary agent – God the Son

    Material Cause – The four elements: earth, air, fire & water.
    Because these four are only fundamental forms of the single type of matter, they cannot be related to any idea of ‘elements’ as understood by modern science – they could be transmuted into each other. Different substances, although composed of matter would have different properties due to the differing amounts of the qualities of form and spirit. Thus a lump of lead is made of the same type of matter (fundamental form) as a lump of gold, but has a different aggregation of constituents. Neither lead nor gold would contain much spirit – not as much as air, say, and certainly not as much as God, who is purely spiritual. ( ALCHEMY )

    Final Cause – Holy Spirit

    All other is ‘natural’ – underwritten by God in maintaining the laws of nature without recourse to the supernatural.
    Science was the method for investigating the world. It involved carrying out careful experiments, with nature as the ultimate arbiter of which theories were right and which were wrong.

    Robert Grosseteste (1168-1253) Bishop of Lincoln (Robert ‘Bighead’) – neo-Platonic reading of Genesis – emanation of God’s goodness, like light, begins creation. Light is thus a vehicle of creation and likewise knowledge (hence ‘illumination’), a dimensionless point of matter with a dimensionless point of light superimposed upon it (dimensions are created by God). Spherical radiation of light carries matter with it until it is dissipated. Led to studies of optical phenomena (rainbow, refraction, reflection).

    Picture of stained glass window said to portray ROBERT GROSSETESTE ©

    ROBERT GROSSETESTE

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    NICOLAUS COPERNICUS (1473-1543)

    1543 – Poland

    ‘The Sun is at the centre of the solar system, fixed and immobile, and planets orbit around it in perfect circles in the following order: Mercury, Venus, Earth with its moon, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn’

    diagram of the heliocentric Copernican system

    The Copernican system defied the dogma that the Earth stood still at the centre of the universe – a concept that dated back to ARISTOTLE, which had been given observational legitimacy by PTOLEMY and authority by Christendom – and set forth a new theory of a Sun centered universe. Why would God create a hugely complicated system of equants, epicycles and eccentrics, as Ptolemy had used to explain planetary motion around the Earth, when it would be much more simple and graceful to have them all revolving around the Sun?

    “Eight hundred years before Copernicus, a model of the solar system was advanced with the Earth as a planet orbiting the Sun along with other planets”
    A few centuries later this idea fell into disfavour with the early Christian Church, which placed mankind at the centre of the universe in a geo-centric model. The alternative teaching would be deemed heresy punishable by death and it would not be until the seventeenth century that the work of GALILEO, KEPLER and NEWTON gave credence to the ideas revitalized by Copernicus in 1543.

    Not only did Copernicus place the Sun at the centre of the solar system, but he also gave detailed accounts of the motions of Earth, the Moon and those planets that were known at that time. Between 1510 and 1514 he drafted Commentariolus, his initial exposition of the theory. In order to have credence, the idea required that the Earth itself be not fixed in position. He said that the Earth revolves on its own axis once every twenty-four hours, which accounts for day and night and explains the apparent movement of the stars and Sun across the sky. Copernicus suggested in Commentariolus that the time taken for each planet to complete its cycle through the night sky might increase the further it is from the Sun.

    Mercury’s cycle takes 88 days, which makes it the nearest planet to the Sun. Venus takes 225 days, Earth 1 year, Mars 1.9 years, Jupiter 12 years and Saturn 30 years. Thus Copernicus was able to work out the truth and attempted to establish the order of the planets.

    He did not publish his findings because they were thought to contravene the teachings of the Catholic Church. Religious leaders of his time were against him. Martin Luther (founder of the Lutheran Church in Germany) denounced him as ‘a new astrologer…. the fool’ who wanted ‘to overturn the entire science of astronomy’. His book De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium (On the revolution of the celestial spheres) was published at the very end of his life, and a copy placed on his deathbed. Thus the greatest astronomer of his time died without seeing his book in print – the book as influential as Newton’s Principia and Darwin’s ‘On The Origin of Species’.

    portrait said to depict NICOLAUS COPERNICUS

    NICOLAUS COPERNICUS

    The text was rejected by many academics; partially because the author had undermined the simplicity of his initial ideas by clinging to the Aristotelian belief that planetary motion took place in perfect circles. This meant Copernicus had been forced to introduce his own system of epicycles and other complex motions to fit in with observational evidence, thereby producing as equally complicated an explanation as the geocentric one he had initially rejected for its lack of simplicity.

    It was not until Johannes Kepler offered the solution that the planets move in an elliptical, not circular, motion in 1609 that the simplicity that Copernicus had been seeking was offered and the rest of the model could be vindicated.

    In fact, it was not until 1616 that the Church banned the text Copernicus eventually published for its ‘blasphemous’ content, although that sanction remained in place until 1835.

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    WILLEBRORD SNELL (1580-1626)

    1621 – Holland

    woodblock print portrait of WILLEBRORD SNELL ©

    WILLEBRORD SNELL

    ‘During refraction of light, the ratio of the sines of the angles of incidence ( i ) and refraction ( r ) is a constant equal to the refractive index of the medium’

    In equation form: n1sini = n2 sinr , where n1 and n2 are the respective refractive indices of the two media.

    The refractive index of a substance is a measure of its ability to bend light. The higher the number the better light is refracted. The refractive index of diamond, 2.42, is the highest of all gems.

    Refraction is the change in direction of a ray of light when it crosses the boundary between the two media. It happens because light has different speeds in different media. A ray of light entering a medium where the speed of light is less (from air to water, for example) bends towards the perpendicular to the boundary of the two media. It bends away from the perpendicular when it crosses from water to air. Refraction was known to ancient Greeks, but Snell, a Dutch mathematician, was the first to study it.

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    "School of Athens" Fresco in Apostol...

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